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2024 Classroom

The mission of MAFFC is to provide high-quality training that is affordable. With that in mind, we offer these classroom sessions for FREE.  Wednesday (5/15) and Thursday (5/16)

 

Wednesday 5/15

Caleb Smith

Modern Search Mindset

Decades ago, the fire service recognized a change in the fire environment, fires were getting hotter faster. In response, studies and debates ensued on the best way to combat this "modern fire", but what did we do about search? Using modern data from sources like Firefighter Rescue Survey, UL/NIST, and USFA, this class aims to teach students not only how we can change our training, mindset, and searches, but why.

 

The Purpose of Passion

If you asked a room of firefighters what the most important quality is in a firefighter candidate, you would likely hear "Passion" mentioned high on the list- but what is passion? How can we create a culture that creates and grows passionate people? This class takes a look at some of the answers to these questions, and challenges students to reflect not only on their department, but themselves.

 

Jason Joannides

Ladder Company Operations: Building an Operational Guideline

Ladder company functions must be performed and executed correctly on every fireground. Whether you’re an urban fire department or rural volunteer department, these tasks must be executed. Many organizations struggle to put together and build operational guidelines that flow properly with the fireground tactics. This classroom session will cover step by step, how to build, complete, and distribute a comprehensive ladder operations guideline.

 

Christopher Naum

Reading the Building: Building FACTS and the Size-up on Today’s Fireground

Today’s buildings and occupancies continue to present unique challenges to command and operating companies during combat structural fire engagement. Building and occupancy profiling, identifying occupancy risk versus occupancy type, construction methods, features, systems and components require new skill sets in reading the building and implementing predictive occupancy profiling for today’s firefighters, company and command officers for effective and efficient fireground operations. Incorporating the Buildings on fire FACTS concept for First-Arriving Construction, Tactics and Safety, this program provides an overview of the methodology and process to increase operational effectiveness and ensure critical building factors are identified, assessment and monitored throughout the incident. Focus on Residential and small foot-print Commercial occupancies.

Challenges and Insights on Firefighting Operations in Mega-Mansions & Large Area Residential: Sea-side to Country Side.

Today’s residential homes are being built larger than ever and in all community settings from rural to suburban to urban and common throughout all jurisdictions across the United States. These occupancies present significant risks and operational challenges to commanders and firefighters demanding increased knowledge and skill sets to select and employ various operational models at these structure fires. The program provides leading insights on building construction systems, design configurations, and characteristics of common large area residential and mega-mansions--homes ranging from 4,000 to 40,000 square feet, with operational focus on the 6,000-18,000 SF residential footprint. Addressing coastal and sea-side operational concerns with a transition to footprints in urban, suburban to country-side settings will be presented with an integrated approach to construction, operations and tactical options. Original research, modeling, a standardized approach to building classification and cutting-edge operational insights will be presented, with Near-miss and LODD case studies reinforcing topical areas. All New for 2024.

The Commercial Fireground OPS: FACTS First-Arriving Construction, Tactics, Safety and Operational Considerations for Today’s Commercial Buildings

The Buildings and Structures that provide occupancy and use for commercial functions and services continue to evolve at a rapid pace with emerging construction methods, new materials and innovated architectural treatments and emergent engineering practices. This common Occupancy Type has evolved into a conspicuous Occupancy Risk posing unique challenges to Field Companies, Officers and Commanders that suggest increased building intelligence and operational due-diligence. Today’s Commercial Occupancies and the buildings and structures they reside within present increasing challenges that impact fireground operations on a wide variation of levels that include with increasing frequency; adverse compartment fire conditions, structural compromise & collapse and the reduction of tactical windows based on diminishing building performance under fire conditions. The program objective is to focus increase awareness and understandings in the fundamentals of building construction, architecture and engineering design that directly impact firefighting and influence command operations at commercial structure fires.
• A discussion of emerging trends in Building Construction Design, Systems, Occupancy Risks, Methods & Materials, Collapse & Compromise Characteristics, Fire Protection and Fire Dynamics related to Building Anatomy in Small Foot-print Commercial Occupancies will be presented.
• Emerging Trends in Hybrid Construction and new Methods and Materials of Construction and Systems (MCC).
• Understanding key inherent building performance characteristics and their relationships and variables in Command Decision-making methodologies and practices is fundamental to firefighting and incident management on today’s evolving and demanding fireground.
• The new MCC with Cross Laminate Timber and Mass Timber Hybrids
• Facilitated Case Studies

 

Buildings on fire: Podium, CLT, Mass Timber and Hybrid Construction; Trends and Case Studies

 

An overview discussion of emerging national and regional trends related to emerging Mixed-use and Multiple-Occupancy Podium, Hybrid Cross Laminate Timber (CLT) structures, Evolving Mass Timber low-rise buildings and Hybrid Construction. The program will examine trends in Building Construction Systems, Methods & Materials of Construction (MMC) and Design related to the New Mass Timber and Cross Laminate Timber (CLT) construction and Podium and Donut construction designs and will focus on emerging lessons and learnings from major property and construction site fires resulting in major fire service operational challenges and community-wide risks and significant property losses. The primary objective of this program is to increase awareness and understandings on these new building construction, architecture, engineering and design systems that directly impact firefighting and command operations at future structure fires. Case studies and emerging lessons of recent national major construction site fires (MA, NC, CA, VA and MD) involving these structure types will be discussed.

Course objectives
• Increase awareness and understandings in the building construction and engineering design related to emerging Mixed-use and Multiple-Occupancy Podium, Hybrid Cross Laminate Timber (CLT) structures, Evolving Mass Timber low-rise buildings and Hybrid Construction.
• Present a historical context of trends in design, layouts and construction that have evolved to the present that may influence operational deployments and planning.
• Identify predictable building performance characteristics that affect may impact incident response and operations.
• Through the review and integration of case studies and after-action reports of select major incidents, the student shall be able to apply lessons, learnings and best practices.
• Facilitate a discussion on insights from continued emerging trends derived from construction-site fires, partially completed building complexes that suggest proactive risk management and planning.



Cody Long

Programming the Probie

If you want to gain strength, the most effective way is a planned-out workout schedule. If you want to lose weight, a planned-out diet. What about training a probie? In recruit schools, there is a planned-out schedule of what and when topics are taught, but what about after when they're in the station? Programming the probie looks at an effective way to train and develop probationary firefighters into high functioning firefighters, regardless of what generation they belong to, or what their background is. For many, we learned to train new firefighters the way we learned. But is it the most effective? Does it consistently produce quality firefighters across the board?
 

 

Amanda Miller

Future Ready Fire: Get in gear.

A zero-cost, non-proprietary program for firefighters to use as they see fit, in order to maintain competency and build brotherhood.

 

Jonah Smith

The First Five Minutes: The Must haves for the first arriving

The first five minutes on the fire ground generally dictate how the remainder of the incident will go. Successful company level training evolutions are presented to affect a holistic overview of effective methods for the first-arriving company in any jurisdiction. Firefighters and company officers are introduced to methods for proper size-up, deployment, and assignment of resources that facilitate positive and successful fire ground outcomes in jurisdictions of all sizes.

Kevin Manhardt

Not Your Garden Variety Fire: Multi-Family Fire Operations

With rapid changes to today’s socioeconomical landscape and the rapid growth of suburban communities, we are seeing more American’s forego the white picket fence to take up residence in a multi-family occupancy. These buildings are also following today’s trends in modern construction, creating hazards and operational difficulty for fire departments. This program provides a tactical insight into operations in garden-style apartments, condominiums, and townhomes. We will go into building construction, tactics, and incident management, as well as many other important tidbits that will make your next fire a success. Fires in these types of residences pose a high life hazard and may be some of the toughest fires we may face as the modern fire company. 

 

Micah Rains

Hook Up and Stretch: High-Rise and Mid-Rise Operations

Fire ground operations on residential structure fires are the routine fire call that most departments encounter. However, high-rise and mid-rise standpipe operations present a new set of challenges on the fire ground. This could be a true high-rise in a downtown district or it could be a four-story hotel in a more rural area. Regardless of the location, the same outcome is expected. We must go in, we must aggressively search, and we must make the stretch. 
This presentation covers the basic first due tactics and assignments that must be implemented to have a successful outcome during a high-rise or mid-rise incident. It will cover basic standpipe operations but will also present challenges and solutions when standpipes fail. In addition to this, the class will look at several high-rise and mid-rise case studies. Hook Up and Stretch will challenge you in preparing and training for structure fires when making the stretch from a standpipe.

Detailed Leadership, Aggressive Tactics

Intentional leadership is the foundation for success within an organization, on the fire ground, and when building relationships. From the bay floor to the battalion car, leadership succeeds or fails based on investment in the details. This class examines how good leadership can translate into aggressive tactics on the fire ground. The qualities of a good leader, how to manage others, and supporting the mission of the fire service on the fireground will be discussed. To win on the fire ground, we must be able to lead in the firehouse.
The second part of this class focusses on the need for aggressive tactics, quick decision-making, and proactive firemanship on today’s fireground. This presentation will cover tactics for the first arriving company, engine tactics, support company tactics, and aggressive command presence. Fireground tactics begin with a mindset, are developed through training, and must be executed with aggression.

 

Zach Bruhn

Mid-Rise Operations with Limited Staffing

Mid-Rise Operations with Limited Staffing prepares firefighters to arrive first on scene at a Mid or Wide-Rise structure fires. This course is designed for members of departments that operate with a small number of personnel and limited apparatus typing as well as members of larger departments. Modern Mid-Rise structures such as NFPA220 Type IIIA four and five story hotels and apartments present a dangerous and dynamic fire ground. It is not uncommon to find these types of structures popping up along highways and interstates in rural and urban environments across our nation and if fire protection districts and municipalities with very limited available resources. Fires in these types of structures come with a high life safety risk and present unique building construction concerns. Lessons learned encompass topics ranging from building construction, protection system types, size-up, series pumping and multiple FDC and water supply options. The course examines a multitude of interior and exterior tactics, to include prioritizing strategies such as fire attack, search & evacuation, stairwell search groups and integration of ICS all for success in these high-risk low-occurrence fires. Class prepares students to handle the array of possible standpipe and FDC pumping scenarios that are common among medium rise building fires. The course includes a short in-classroom hands-on-training display which demonstrates multiple hose-load options such as the Denver, New York and Coil methods and how these hose-loads operate with both hallway and stairwell deployments. Additional training includes standpipe connection and by-pass options, fire pump and FDC operations which are common in these distinctive structures. This course will outline the strategic goals and tactical objectives to be taken along with the need for solid decision making with a limited amount of staffing to ensure that firefighters will respond, quickly, safely and meet the needs of the citizens they serve.

Dennis Reilly

Tactical Excellence, It Doesn’t Just Happen

Excellence is the standard our public expects from their fire department and the standard they rightfully deserve. Unfortunately, some fire departments do not understand the complexities of building teams that can operate at this level. This program will provide specific actions steps that can help officers and chiefs build operational units that can function at a high level in dynamic high-risk situations.

Tim O'Connor

Mental Health MAYDAYS

Mental Health is a subject in the fire service that is still considered taboo. It is seen as a sign of weakness to have a mental health issue, and even more of a weakness to ask for help. This is WRONG! Now more than ever, we must change the view on Mental Health before it’s too late. 30% of Firefighters suffer from at least one mental health condition at some point in their career. The majority of those will suffer in silence because they don’t realize what is happening or what options are out there to help. Just like being lost or disoriented, an air emergency or a fall through the floor, a Mental Health issue is a MAYDAY for us. We need to treat it as such. This course will touch on statistics of mental health, common mental health conditions affecting the fire service, how you can ask for help (sounding the MAYDAY), options for dealing with them personally and professionally (sending in the RIT TEAM), as well as some peer support techniques for a fast response (buddy rescue).

 

Fire/EMS and the RTF

With the increasing level of violence seen in the world today, the need to operate as part of the response to an active assailant/active intruder incident is ever increasing. It is no longer a matter of IF it will happen in your area, it’s WHEN. So, WHEN the time comes, do you know what to do? What is your part in the puzzle? FIRE/EMS units have a myriad of responsibilities when operating in a Rescue Task Force (RTF). Triage. Treatment. Movement. Transport. Command. Training normally focuses on triage and treatment. What happens with the rest? As the fire department and EMS agency are involved, you need to be competent in all aspects of the response. Things are done differently in these situations. This course will discuss the formation of a RTF, triage and treatment skills, pt movement, transport set up, and Command functions to include integrated command with the police. These events are the most stressful response we will ever make. We need to make sure we have done everything possible to know what will be required and have a plan to make it work beforehand.

 

Nick Peppard

Running Scared: Risk Management NOT Risk Aversion

Running Scared: Risk Management NOT Risk Aversion (2-hour LECTURE)\

“Risk a lot to save a lot.” “Our safety is our number one priority.” “Hit it hard from the yard!” “Roof ops are too dangerous!” “Don’t trust a truss.” “It’s not my emergency.” “Community risk reduction is the answer.” “Vacant buildings are too dangerous to commit personnel to the interior.” “Clean cabs don’t make grabs!” Survivability profiling. Transitional attack. Risk/Benefit Analysis. 2-in/2-out. “We are really an EMS department that goes to fires occasionally.”

If you’ve been around the fire service for any length of time then you’ve probably at least heard of and, in many cases, discussed (sometimes animatedly) these concepts, terms and mindsets. While many of these concepts were well-intended and may even contain some fundamental truths, they have often been distorted and used as cultural weapons within our industry. 

The fire service seems to be experiencing a state of contrast, contention and, at times, even conflict these days. At the center of that contention is a battle for the very fabric of who we are and why we exist. As the fire service seems to be creeping closer and closer to white collar business practices and continues to say “yes” to more diversified service models, many are left wondering what is happening to our identity and future as firefighters. With many on both sides of the aisle passionately declaring their positions on safety, incident priorities and risk management, it is important now more than ever that we take a real, honest look at what our citizens want and expect from us as the American fire service. We mustn't base our decisions on anecdote, emotional vitriol, or feelings, but rather on real data, hard numbers, and a unified mission of saving those who cannot save themselves. 

This class examines the dichotomy of risk management and the subsequent impacts that the safety culture of the past two decades has had on the American fire service. The class will 
dissect the concepts of mission creep and normalization of deviance within our service. It will review and facilitate discussion on the current cultural divide pertaining to strategic, tactical and safety strategies being employed across the nation. It reviews extensive data, technical knowledge, and real world experiences to unwrap the many layers of the cultural battle happening amongst us in an effort to present sound, unemotional reasoning and create open, meaningful dialogue with the end goal being unity, mission readiness, and a return to our fundamental, blue-collar roots of service before self. Finally, it takes a hard look at the facts behind firefighter fatalities, and how to use current data to keep us centered on our mission of saving lives and property, not running scared from anecdotal myths and fire service folklore!

As John Paul Jones, the Father of the United States Navy, once said, “It seems to be a law of nature, inflexible and inexorable, that those who will not risk cannot win.” 

Firehouse Culture: Ideas Over Egos 


Have you ever noticed how many times we dismiss great ideas because of WHO is presenting them? So often we in the fire service fail to even consider ideas because we "don't like so and so" or "have a beef" with someone over something they said or did. We often allow petty differences, personal egos or stereotypes to cloud our judgment and in doing so miss many great concepts, ideas, and innovations. Oftentimes messages get lost in translation due to who is delivering the information or how we perceive their delivery. We get caught up in politics and popularity contests which causes our organizations to stagnate and become toxic environments, rather than positive, productive and proactive firehouses. I believe we as a fire service can and should do our part to use sound judgment and value ideas over personalities. We owe it to our citizens and our brothers and sisters to let the best ideas win! 

This 2-hour Lecture covers manifestations of an ego driven culture and examines ways to combat this issue in your own firehouse. This class takes an honest, blue-collar approach to building productive teams where the best ideas win! 

Dylan Briggs

Efficient Equals Effective


This class will encompass strategies to build into a firefighter's personnel and crew training methodology in order to become more efficient in all aspects of the job. The practice of efficiency without the end goal of effectiveness can often lead down the road of laziness and complacency. However, if we have the end goal of being effective firefighters and fire crews for THEM, then we can achieve the desired outcome. 

During the course we will discuss improvement in turnout times, personnel gear layout, job specific tool selection, riding assignments, tailboard time, scene size up, forcible entry, apparatus design, and more. Portions of this class will address the career firefighter, the volunteer firefighter, and members of apparatus design committees. 

 

Dave Coker

Building Construction 101: What's in Your First Due?

In this course, we will dive into the foundational basics of residential building construction. We'll review building components and methods through the lens of specific time periods and how these components and methods react under fire conditions. We'll also discuss ways you can "decode" the residential building construction in your own first due using neighborhood boundaries and historical information about your city/town/county. This isn't an NFPA building construction class. You'll walk out of this class with information you can immediately apply when you get home.

 

Dennis Reilly

Tactical Excellence, It Doesn’t Just Happen

Excellence is the standard our public expects from their fire department and the standard they rightfully deserve. Unfortunately, some fire departments do not understand the complexities of building teams that can operate at this level. This program will provide specific actions steps that can help officers and chiefs build operational units that can function at a high level in dynamic high-risk situations.

Barry Olsen

Should VES be in the regular playbook?

Discussing why VES should be a used tactic in the playbook. How to do it fast and when we should go beyond the door. Ways to isolate the room when the door is missing. And most importantly how to remove victims when they’re found ranging from small to large.

Thursday 5/16

 

 

Tim O'Connor

First Due with a Clue

Everyone wants to be First Due to every fire they are dispatched to. But what happens when you are successful at beating everyone there? Do you know what needs to be done? Can you accomplish it all? Nothing is worse than arriving first, only to be beat to the seat by the 2nd due because you were unsure of what needed to be done or how to do it. This course will discuss the necessary tasks of the Engine and the Truck when arriving first due. First Due Engine and Truck operations simply put will make or break the fireground. If operations are efficient and executed well, success is easy. If operations are executed poorly, failure will ensue. The public places their blind trust in us each and every day that we will respond quickly and solve their problem, whatever it may be. This class will build upon the belief that everyone must know every job. The Truck relies on the Engine and the Engine needs the Truck. This class will take that belief and hone it to focus on the basics of Engine work and Truck work. It will mold those basics into a fluent coordination of movements that happen on the fireground. These movements collectively allow us to rescue human life and preserve property, which after all is our primary mission. Engine topics include positioning for success, riding and tool assignments, hoseline selection and deployment for the greatest benefit among others. Truck topics will cover positioning around other apparatus, riding and tool assignments, the 2 team concept and how to consolidate positions when short staffed; we will also cover ladders, forcible entry, ventilation and search procedures.

 

Street Smart Extrication

Vehicle extrication is a puzzle. But it's not a normal puzzle; its a puzzle with constantly changing rules. Manufacturers strive to make the best vehicle on the market so they can make the most sales. They design their vehicles to perform safely when involved in an accident. What they dont care about is the Fire Service and its ability to extricate someone from one of their vehicles. Extrication challenges facing today's crews have grown exponentially with new vehicle components and construction practices. This class will help dismantle those practices and show real-world ways to beat them, sometimes by using them to your advantage. Learn maneuvers that can be used to extricate trapped civilians in a tested, timely way.

 

Jason Rivera

Overcoming Common Engine Company Mistakes and Fireground Problems

This participative, discussion-based lecture focuses on a multitude of engine company aspects that, when not handled properly can destroy a fireground operation. These issues apply to all fire departments, big or small, urban or rural. The class is broken up into two sections: mistakes and problems. 
Fireground mistakes are human errors; issues that occur due to incorrect judgement, inexperience or simply not being on our A-game. Mistakes are expected as we are humans, trying to make perfect decisions with imperfect information. It is not the mistake that is often the issue, it is our ability to recover from it which can make or break the entire operation.
Fireground problems are unanticipated challenges that occur at every fire scene. Regardless of what the issue is and what the root cause was, it must be overcome to successfully complete our fireground duties. We will look at this topic from two sides; making sound, experienced-based decisions to avoid issues in the first place as well as overcoming mistakes and problems when they do arise. 
This course has been presented at FDIC since 2017 and throughout the United States in formats ranging from 1 hour 45 minutes to 4-hour blocks.

 

Zach Bruhn

Total Size-Up for the First Due Company Officer

 

This interactive 6-hour class covers all points of a complete Fire Ground Size Up along with an array of strategies and tactics the first due fire officer or firefighter will need to ensure command and control are successfully established on their fire ground. Emphasis is placed on the importance and need for the first due officer or firefighter arriving on the fire ground to implement the correct tactics to acquire strategic success. Students will gain the understanding of how the application of the correct tactical objectives during the initial time of arrival impacts the remainder of the response. These first few minutes on the fire ground can be a challenging time for the first due officer or firefighter. Interpreting what is perceived when rolling up on an incident, making decisions, and relaying information to incoming units are necessary skills fire officers need to develop. Attendees learn how to coordinate a safe and effective attack to quickly mitigate the emergency by expanding on their knowledge of building construction, preplanning, fire flow path identification, smoke condition association and I.A.P. development. The focus is on making timely strategic and tactical decisions and engaging in clear and effective communication in a multitude of different fire ground situations. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in group based rapid size up scenarios and tactic-based videos throughout the class. Group based presentations such as station, district or shifts in their entirety, help to develop vital recognized prime decision-making abilities of attendees. The course encourages centralizing a group’s tactical mindset and expanding their planning and execution abilities thus increasing group performance on the fire ground.

 

Jonah Smith

Common Sense Chiefin'

This course will present achievable and manageable methods to manage at the chief officer level. The course will discuss methods to ensure leadership growth and success at a chief officer level. Additionally, students will grasp clear methods to ensure success from the firehouse to the fireground.

The First Five Minutes: The Must haves for the first arriving

The first five minutes on the fire ground generally dictate how the remainder of the incident will go. Successful company level training evolutions are presented to affect a holistic overview of effective methods for the first-arriving company in any jurisdiction. Firefighters and company officers are introduced to methods for proper size-up, deployment, and assignment of resources that facilitate positive and successful fire ground outcomes in jurisdictions of all sizes.

Daniel "Chunk" Nelms

ABE’s of RIT

There aren’t many fire ground events as intense as a downed firefighter. Hearing a MAYDAY called for one of our own is both mentally and physically taxing. Experience has taught us that successful rapid intervention events are a result of proficiency in basic firefighting essentials, good communication, solid problem-solving skills, and preparedness. There’s no place in today’s fire service to be reactive, especially when it comes to RIT. 

Statistically speaking, the Rapid Intervention Team are last to reach a downed firefighter. It tends to be someone on that crew, a fire company working close by, or the firefighter themselves who make rescue. This means it's crucial that every firefighter has the knowledge and skills to save our own. 

This program has a focus on real world scenarios, as well as a study on the statistics. Our instructors will draw on past experiences, with first-hand accounts of incidents from both the command, strategic, and tactical levels. This class will help grow people’s mindset and core abilities when it comes to an event that is possibly our worst day on the job. Attendees with leave this program with boost in confidence and decision-making abilities during the high stress/low frequency events.

Topics Covered:
- RIT Team Assignments
- Proactive vs Reactive RIT
- ABE’s of Assessing a Downed Firefighter
- Air Management
- Harness Conversion Options
- Firefighter Removals

 

Where they at Though

THEM first is what you hear everyone on this job say over and over. But is this just a catch phrase for you and your department, or do you truly walk the walk. The actions of first due companies at a structural fire can make or break an incident. Making split second decisions and performing critical tasks with low staffing could make the difference between life or death. This requires quick actions upon arrival to locate and eventually remove civilians from the structure. There is no room for error; there is only a short window of opportunity to save a life. When push comes to shove, all the citizen really wants us to do is to save them and their loved ones. 

In this class, we take a deep dive into the most important tactic on the fire ground, SEARCH. We will use our experiences, real world data from the firefighter rescue survey, fire behavior and building construction, along with layout knowledge to prepare ourselves to put THEM first. The point of this course is a mission first mentality. Performing searches should not be an afterthought, it should be regarded as our highest mission on the fire ground. You cannot perform adequately if you do not prepare properly. Occupying the interior is the highest way to decrease civilian fire fatalities. 

You swore to put your life on the line for someone else. This responsibility belongs to all of us, SO DON’T SCREW IT UP! Come join us for a discussion on the most important aspect of our job. 

Topics Covered
- Mindset and Pre-Planning
- The inside and Outside Team Concepts
- Tools and Equipment
- The Firefighter Rescue Survey
- Search Systems
- Vent-Enter-Search

 

Oj Kolodziej

First Arriving: A Winners Mindset

The first class of a 40 hr lecture and hands on combo is ready to be presented! 

First Arriving: Having a winners mindset 

Having a winner's mindset on the fire ground is crucial. 

It means being mentally and physically prepared to face any challenges. While, also remaining calm, focused and having the confidence and resilience to push through whatever the fire scene gives you. 

With a winner's mindset, firefighters can approach each call with determination, adaptability, and a commitment to excellence.

This 4 hr class will cover: 

~First arriving officers decision making 

~Task assignments and management 

~Proper Incident management and communication

 

Nick Peppard

The Tactical Engine (Reloaded)


The Tactical Engine Reloaded is a down and dirty look at the blue-collar fundamentals of aggressive engine work. This recently updated class has been stripped down, overhauled and restructured to add more technical knowledge, real world scenarios and dynamic discussion points. This class will examine effective tactics for first-alarm assignment engine companies. It will explore efficiently performing essential fireground tasks, will delve into tactical priorities and will examine fireground decision making. The class will also address truck work for engines that don’t have the luxury of properly staffed truck companies arriving in a timely manner. Subjects covered will include attributes and foundational principles of building a high-performing engine company, size up, initial actions, water supply considerations, the engine search, forcible entry, coordinated ventilation, riding assignments, weapon selection, hose line management, and how to maximize limited staffing/resources in various operational arenas. This class is geared toward those looking to maximize the performance of their engine company. 

Engineering Excellence

The professional Driver/Engineer must understand and leverage the ENTIRE water delivery system from start to finish. They must not only understand the “What”, but also the “How” and the “Why” of their equipment, tactics and their position. Driver/Engineers must truly be masters of water delivery and application. They are expected to be intimately familiar with the weapons at their disposal and wield them in a way so as to maximize their impact on the fire scene. The reality is great driver/engineers are not made by accident. They are systematically built through knowledge, training and experience. This class takes an extensive look at water delivery and application. It delves into the equipment, strategic goals, and tactical deployment models that are essential to success at the pump panel. It examines extensive technical knowledge, hydraulics, pump design, hose and nozzle construction, and how our strategies, tactics, equipment impact our effectiveness on the fireground. If you’re a student of all things ENGINE, this is the class for you!

 

Randy Feltner

You got the Bugles, now what??

When those bugles are pinned on your collar, you’ve ARRIVED right? Unfortunately, that is the thought that runs through many of our heads when we get made. The truth is, that thought couldn’t be further from the truth when you accept the responsibility of a leadership position. All too often our ego gets in the way when we go from taking direction to giving it, and we forget all the lessons (good and bad) we learned while we were riding backwards preparing to wear those bugles. I say this because I was one of the people I am describing above. I was given the opportunity while being off during an injury to do some reflecting on my career and the ceiling placed on my career that I couldn’t seem to break through. After taking stock of my personal and professional life I was faced with the hard truth that I was failing miserably. It’s easy to say, but simple changes in my actions led to personal goals and aspirations coming to fruition but also the goals and aspirations of many of my teammates. Together we all started to thrive on and off the job. My goal is to share these simple steps so that the next generation of leaders doesn't have to play catch up as they progress in their career. I wish I had listened earlier and not wasted years of not only my career but the careers of the firefighters I was given the opportunity to serve.

It’s Still Killing Us, Cardiac Event Prevention for Firefighters

The Fire Service is a data driven industry; we use statistics for everything. One statistic we can never seem to get away from is that on average the percentage of firefighter deaths hovers around 50 percent. We are force fed this number from the time we take our first class until the day we retire if we are fortunate enough to make it that day. Thousands of hours have been spent studying and research on this topic, just because the statistics aren’t on our side does not mean we have to accept it as a forever fact. Fitness programs and medical screenings have improved and there has never been more focus on firefighter health and wellness from management, however there is much more that we can do at the grass roots level. This course will discuss additional health screenings and other measures we can take individually to ensure that not only we are here to respond effectively when dispatched but also make it home to our loved ones when we leave the station. As a Firefighter and Heart Attack Survivor, I have the responsibility to pay forward my good fortune and ensure that other firefighters do not find themselves in the position I found myself in.

Chief Christopher J. Naum, SFPE

The Commercial Fireground OPS: FACTS First-Arriving Construction, Tactics, Safety and Operational Considerations for Today’s Commercial BuildingsThe Buildings and Structures that provide occupancy and use for commercial functions and services continue to evolve at a rapid pace with emerging construction methods, new materials and innovated architectural treatments and emergent engineering practices. This common Occupancy Type has evolved into a conspicuous Occupancy Risk posing unique challenges to Field Companies, Officers and Commanders that suggest increased building intelligence and operational due-diligence. Today’s Commercial Occupancies and the buildings and structures they reside within present increasing challenges that impact fireground operations on a wide variation of levels that include with increasing frequency; adverse compartment fire conditions, structural compromise & collapse and the reduction of tactical windows based on diminishing building performance under fire conditions. The program objective is to focus increase awareness and understandings in the fundamentals of building construction, architecture and engineering design that directly impact firefighting and influence command operations at commercial structure fires. 
• A discussion of emerging trends in Building Construction Design, Systems, Occupancy Risks, Methods & Materials, Collapse & Compromise Characteristics, Fire Protection and Fire Dynamics related to Building Anatomy in Small Foot-print Commercial Occupancies will be presented.
• Emerging Trends in Hybrid Construction and new Methods and Materials of Construction and Systems (MCC). 
• Understanding key inherent building performance characteristics and their relationships and variables in Command Decision-making methodologies and practices is fundamental to firefighting and incident management on today’s evolving and demanding fireground. 
• The new MCC with Cross Laminate Timber and Mass Timber Hybrids 
• Facilitated Case Studies 

 

It’s Still Killing Us, Cardiac Event Prevention for Firefighters

The Fire Service is a data driven industry; we use statistics for everything. One statistic we can never seem to get away from is that on average the percentage of firefighter deaths hovers around 50 percent. We are force fed this number from the time we take our first class until the day we retire if we are fortunate enough to make it that day. Thousands of hours have been spent studying and research on this topic, just because the statistics aren’t on our side does not mean we have to accept it as a forever fact. Fitness programs and medical screenings have improved and there has never been more focus on firefighter health and wellness from management, however there is much more that we can do at the grass roots level. This course will discuss additional health screenings and other measures we can take individually to ensure that not only we are here to respond effectively when dispatched but also make it home to our loved ones when we leave the station. As a Firefighter and Heart Attack Survivor, I have the responsibility to pay forward my good fortune and ensure that other firefighters do not find themselves in the position I found myself in. 

 

Tyler Prater

Occupied Until Proven Vacant

Our legal system uses the "Innocent until proven guilty" philosophy as incorporated by our founding fathers. Now, someone please tell me why firefighters are treating building fires as "VACANT UNTIL PROVEN OCCUPIED?"

This 4-hour class will take the experienced suburban firefighter and give them the tools to be aggressive when searching fire buildings. This eye-opening discussion will help us look at the bigger picture of the primary search and the multiple components that come along with it! This course will discuss size up techniques, search tactics, fire behavior and case studies then connect them to our personal experiences. Group discussion / participation is ENCOURAGED. This isn't your average sit back and relax lecture, this is a passionate discussion on how to make our firefighters better at aggressive interior search operations in the fire building. This is one topic you do not want to take lightly!

 

Dennis Reilly

Training Firefighters to Win on the Fireground

One can make the argument that the traditional approach to training does not adequately prepare their members to be successful on the fireground. This program is designed to identify the short comings with the conventional approach to fire service training and offer suggestions to help you improve your training program. The quality of your service is directly tied to the quality of your training. This program will help you to close the gap between expectations and performance.

 

Building the Team That Everyone Wants to Join

Success on the emergency scene is directly tied to the environment and culture at the firehouse. Whereas many feel these are 30,000 feet macro issues relegated to the fire chief, any firehouse can build the environment to support operational excellence. This lecture will present simple, actionable steps to ensure that the time you spend in the firehouse supports the service delivery your community expects.

 

Chris Kessinger

Maximize your extrication

This course is designed to maximize the capabilities with the limited staffing operations we are facing across the country. With tool selection, tactics and placement we teach the rescuer to be able to accomplish rapid extrication of any victim they will face. The training and scenarios are based on twenty years of rescue experience and real world application. Students from all levels of experience will be able to take the knowledge learned back to their departments and help save lives

 

Ryan Gates

Resolute Leadership: Learning to lead from any level

Having the courage to lead even when we are not in a leadership position takes courage. You may often be misunderstood or even seen as a threat. Informal leaders have been vital to the sustained success of the fire service for decades. Leadership is too often seen as something above us, or out of our reach. During this lecture we will dive into ways you can affect positive change from any rank, leadership pitfalls, lessons learned, and how to recover from mistakes we will inevitably make. Join us for an open, honest, and high energy discussion about how we, the current and future leaders of the fire service, can be better servants to those around us.

 

Bill Lang

HazMat: First Due Considerations

This program will empower current and future company officers to remain confident and mission focused when they find themselves first on-scene at a potential hazardous materials incident. Through first-hand experience, case studies, and other lessons learned, this program will instill within each participant the confidence to make sound decisions during the critical first 30 minutes on the scene of a potential hazmat incident.

 

Kevin Lewis

Say YES to VES

When seconds matter, if not you, then who? The Fire Department mission is protecting life and there are no excuses. To honor our oath and to be the best Firemen we can, we must fully understand fire dynamics as they relate to VES. This will allow us to execute and operate at the maximum level of proficiency while upholding our primary mission. Life Safety. The course will cover VES size up, evaluating risk/need for VES, step by step how to techniques, go or no-go scenarios, and when and where aspects of VES. 

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